William J. Freed


William J. Freed, Ph.D.
Visiting Professor
E-mail: wfreedx@yahoo.com


Education

1977 Doctor of Philosophy degree, University of Kansas
1973 Masters of Arts degree, University of Kansas
1971 Bachelor of Arts degree, Rutgers University

Positions

2018 – Present Visiting Professor; Center for Neuropsychiatric Research, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan.
Retired Senior Investigator, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, U.S.A.
2012 – 2014 Senior Investigator and Chief, Section on Development & Plasticity, Cellular Neurobiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD.
1998 – 2011 Senior Investigator, Chief, Section on Development & Plasticity, and Chief, Cellular Neurobiology Research Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD.
1983-1997 Chief, Preclinical Neurosciences Section and Research Psychologist, Neuropsychiatry Branch, National Institute Mental Health, Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, DC.
1980-1982 Senior Staff Fellow, Adult Psychiatry Branch, Division of Special Mental Health Research, National Institute of Mental Health, Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, DC.
1977-1979 Staff Fellow, Laboratory of Clinical Psychopharmacology, Division of Special Mental Health Research, Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Mental Health, Saint Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, DC.
1973-1976 Research Assistant with Dr. E.K. Michaelis, Department of Human Development, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS.
1971-1973 Research Assistant with Dr. J. Mendelson, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS.
1970-1971 Laboratory Technician for Dr. J. Mendelson, Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
1967-1969 Psychiatric Aide at Greystone Park State Hospital, Greystone Park, New Jersey.

Honors and Awards

1989 Public Health Service Superior Service Award
1988 Public Health Service Superior Service Award
1984 Arthur S. Flemming Award for outstanding government service, Washington Jaycees
1983 A.E. Bennett Award for Basic Research in Biological Psychiatry, Society for Biological Psychiatry

Selective Publications

  1. Lee, C.T., Freed, W.J., and Mash, D.C. CNVs in neurodevelopmental disorders.  Editorial, Oncotarget, 2015.
  2. Lee, C.T., Bendriem, R.M., Freed, W.J. A new technique for modeling neuronal connectivity using human pluripotent stem cells. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 2015 33 (3):347-356.
  3. Lee, C.T., Bendriem, R.M., Kindberg, A.A., Worde, L.T., Williams, M.P., Drgon T. Mallon, B.S., Harvey, B.K., Richie, C.T., Hamilton, R.S., Chen, J., Errico, S.L. Tsai, S.Y., Uhl, G.R., and Freed, W.J. Functional consequences of 17q21.31/WNT3-WNT9B amplification in hPSCs with respect to neural differentiation. Cell Reports, 2015 Feb 3;10(4):616-32.
  4. Kindberg, A.A., Bendriem, R.M., Spivak, C.E., Chen, J., Handreck, A., Lupica, c.R., Liu, J., Freed, W.J., and Lee, C.T: An in vitro model of uman neocortical development using pluripotent stem cells:  Cocaine-inducted cytoarchitectural alterations. Disease Models & Mechanisms, 2014;7(12):1397-1405.
  5. Lee, C.T., Chen, J., Worden, L.T., and Freed, W.J.: Cocaine causes deficits in radial migration and alters the distribution of glutamate and GABA neurons in the developing rat cerebral cortex. Synapse, 2011;65(1):21-34.
  6. Tsai, S.Y., Lee, C.T., Hayashi, T., Freed, W.J., and Su, T.P. Delta opioid peptide DADLE and naltrexone cause cell cycle arrest and differentiation in a CNS neural progenitor cell line. Synapse, 64(4):267-273, 2010.
  7. Vazin, T. and Freed, W.J.: Human embryonic stem cells: Derivation, culture, and differentiation: A review. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 28:589-603, 2010.
  8. Chen, J., Tsai, S.Y., Vazin, T., Coggiano, M., and Freed, W.J.: Human embryonic stem cells which express hrGFP in the undifferentiated state and during dopaminergic differentiation. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 27(4):359-370, 2009.
  9. Lee, C.T., Lehrmann, E., Hayashi, T., Amable, R., Tsai, S.Y., Chen, J., Sanchez, J.F., Shen, J., Becker, K.G., and Freed, W.J.: Gene expression profiling reveals distinct cocaine-responsive genes in human fetal CNS cell t Journal of Addiction Medicine, 3(4):218-226, 2009.
  10. Vazin T., Becker, K.G., Chen, J., Spivak, C.E., Lupica, C.R., Zhang, Y., Worden, L., and Freed, W.J.: A novel combination of factors, termed SPIE, which promotes dopaminergic neuron differentiation from human embryonic stem cells. PLoS One, 4(8):e6606, 2009.
  11. Castillo, C.G., Mendoza-Trejo, S., Aguilar, M.B., Freed, W.J., and Giordano, M.: Intranigral transplants of a GABAergic cell line produce long-term alleviation of established motor seizures. Behavioral Brain Research, 193(1):17-27, 2008.
  12. Freed, W.J., Chen, J., Backman, C.M., Schwartz, C.M., Vazin, T., Cai, J., Spivak, C.E., Lupica, C.R., Rao, M.S., and Zeng, X.: Gene expression profile of neuronal progenitor cells derived from hESCs: Activation of chromosome 11p15.5 and comparison to human dopaminergic neurons. PLoS ONE, 3(1):e1422, 2008.
  13. Lee, C.T., Chen, J., Hayashi, T., Tsai, S.Y., Sanchez, J.F., Errico, S.L., Amable, R., Su, T.P., Lowe, R.H., Huestis, M.A., Shen, J., Becker, K.G., Geller, H.M., and Freed, W.J.: A mechanism for the inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation by cocaine. PLoS Medicine, 5(6):e117, 2008.
  14. Lehrmann, E. and Freed, W.J.: Transcriptional correlates of human substance use. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1139:34–42, 2008.
  15. Lehrmann, E., Afanador, Z.R., Deep-Soboslay, A., Gallegos, G., Darwin, W.D., Lowe, R.H., Barnes, A.J., Huestis, M.A., Cadet, J.L., Herman, M.M., Hyde, T.M. Kleinman, J.E., and Freed, W.J.: Postmortem diagnosis and toxicological validation of illicit substance use. Addiction Biology, 13(1):105-117,
  16. Nolte, M.W., Löscher, W., Herden, C., Freed, W.J., and Gernert, M.: Benefits and risks of intranigral transplantation of GABA-producing cells subsequent to the establishment of kindling-induced seizures. Neurobiology Disease, 31(3):342-354, 2008.
  17. Vazin, T., Chen, J., Lee, C.T., Amable, R., and Freed, W.J.: Assessment of stromal-derived inducing activity in the generation of dopaminergic neurons from human embryonic stem cells. Stem Cells, 26(6):1517-1525, 2008.
  18. Vazin, T., Chen, J., Spivak, C.E., Amable, R., Gabitzsch, E., Lee, C.T., Lupica, C.R., and Lupica, W.J.: Dopaminergic neurons derived from BG01V2, a variant of human embryonic stem cell line BG01. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 26(6):447-458, 2008.

Last Update:  2019-06-17

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